Last edited by Nikoshakar
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

6 edition of Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha found in the catalog.

Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha

Queer Black Marxism and the Harlem Renaissance

by Gary Edward Holcomb

  • 253 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by University Press of Florida .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Novels, other prose & writers: from c 1900 -,
  • Literary Criticism,
  • Literature - Classics / Criticism,
  • English,
  • USA,
  • American - African American & Black,
  • American - African American,
  • African Americans,
  • Intellectual life,
  • Jamaican Americans,
  • Race identity

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages288
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8022048M
    ISBN 100813030498
    ISBN 109780813030494

    Reading Migration, Sexuality, and the Urban Folk: Discussion Questions for Claude McKay’s Home to Harlem Overview and Analysis of Secondary Material. It is important to note that the writings of Claude McKay are used in a variety of different ways by scholars and teachers from a wide range of fields. Our focus is clearly gender and sexuality;.   Sample by My Essay Writer Biography Claude McKay was a poet and novelist born on September 15th, , in Sunny Ville, Jamaica. He developed an interest in the British literature at a young age, getting inspired by the works of Alexander Pope and John Milton. He started writing poetry at the age of seventeen, with influence [ ].

      The first chapter of Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha pares away McKay's own efforts to obscure his radical decades in his autobiography A Long Way from Home as McKay sought to find a stable home in the US unmolested by US immigration and security authorities. Much of it is devoted to convincingly showing that McKay's participation in radical Cited by: 5.   David Levering Lewis, When Harlem Was in Vogue (New York: Vintage, ), 50; Kate Baldwin, Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain: Reading Encounters between Black and Red, – (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, ); Gary Edward Holcomb, Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha: Queer Black Marxism and the Harlem Renaissance (Gainesville.

    Claude McKay was a Jamaican-American writer and poet who was amongst the major figures in the Harlem Renaissance. This biography provides detailed information about his childhood, life, achievements, works & timeline. Can You Identify These World Leaders? One of the most influential figures in the Harlem Renaissance, Festus Claudius McKay was a.   Faithful Vision: Treatments of the Sacred, Spiritual, and Supernatural in Twentieth-Century African American Fiction; Cross-Cultural Visions in African American Modernism: From Spatial Narrative to Jazz Haiku; Black Writers, White Publishers: Marketplace Politics in Twentieth-Century African American Literature; Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha: Queer Black Marxism and the .


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Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha by Gary Edward Holcomb Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Sasha" was the code name adopted by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay () to foil investigations of his life and work. Over a period of two decades, the FBI, U.S. State Department, British police and intelligence, and French law enforcement and colonial authorities took turns harassing McKay, an openly gay, Marxist, Jamaican Cited by: Among the most notable contributions to black modernist study, Holcomb's scholarship is the first to assess the consequence of McKay's landmark Romance in Marseille, a text that is, despite its absence from broad public access for nearly 80 years, conceivably the most significant early black diaspora by:   "Sasha" was the code name adopted by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay () to foil investigations of his life and work.

Over a period of two decades, the FBI, U.S. State Department, British police and intelligence, and French law enforcement and colonial authorities took turns harassing McKay, an openly gay, Marxist, Jamaican.

"Sasha" was the code name adopted by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay () to foil investigations of his life and work.

Over a period of two decades, the FBI, U.S. State Department, British police and intelligence, and French law enforcement and colonial authorities took turns harassing McKay, an openly gay, Marxist, Jamaican expatriate who had left the United/5(7). “Sasha” was the code name adopted by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay (–) to foil investigations of his life and work.

Over a period of two decades, the FBI, U.S. State Department, British police and intelligence, and French law enforcement and colonial authorities took turns harassing McKay, an openly gay, Marxist, Jamaican expatriate who had left the United States and was.

Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha Holcomb, Gary Edward Published by University Press of Florida Holcomb, Gary Edward. Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha: Queer Black Marxism and the.

Buy Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha: Queer Black Marxism and the Harlem Renaissance by Gary Edward Holcomb (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Code Name Sasha, “My Real Name” Gary Edward Holcomb.

in Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha. Published by University Press of Florida. Published in print June | ISBN: Published online September | e-ISBN (area code) design Productions A & E Television Networks. "Sasha" was the code name adopted by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay () to foil investigations of his life and work.

Over a period of two decades, the FBI, U.S. State Department, British police and intelligence, and French law enforcement and colonial authorities took turns harassing McKay, an openly gay, Marxist, Jamaican expatriate who had left the United States and was. A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice/Staff Pick Buried in the archive for almost ninety years, Gary Edward Holcomb is the author of Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha: Queer Black Marxism and the Harlem Renaissance () and is the coeditor of Hemingway and the Black Renaissance ().Brand: Penguin Publishing Group.

Free Online Library: Gary Edward Holcomb. Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha: Queer Black Marxism and the Harlem Renaissance.(Book review) by "African American Review"; Literature, writing, book reviews Ethnic, cultural, racial issues Books Book reviews.

Gary Holcomb’s Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha was the first book of its kind to deeply examine the complexity of McKay’s “competing” and overlapping identities as a black, queer, diasporic, briefly Communist, and rigorously-inspired writer. Download Citation | Code Name Sasha, “My Real Name” | This chapter examines Claude McKay's autobiographical novel A Long Way Home which in certain respects comes only second to his FBI files.

Description: Sasha' was the code name adopted by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay () to foil investigations of his life and work.

This work analyzes three of the most important works in McKay's career - the Jazz Age bestseller 'Home to Harlem', the negritude manifesto Banjo, and the unpublished 'Romance in Marseilles. of 47 results for "claude mckay poems" Skip to main search results Amazon Prime. Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha: Queer Black Marxism and the Harlem Renaissance.

by Gary Edward Holcomb | Book Depository Books With Free Delivery Worldwide. Keywords: Claude McKay, McKay, black Marxism, Sasha, Communism, Marxist Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service.

Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter. ☯ Full Synopsis: "Sasha' was the code name adopted by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay () to foil investigations of his life and work.

This work analyzes three of the most important works in McKay's career - the Jazz Age bestseller 'Home to Harlem', the negritude manifesto Banjo, and the unpublished 'Romance in Marseilles.

Holcomb, Gary E. Claude McKay, code name Sasha: queer Black Marxism and the Harlem Renaissance. Gainesville: UP of Florida, Gary Holcomb provides excellent scholarship that addresses the multilayered queer black Marxism the New Negro author's writing. He aims to. Early life in Jamaica. Festus Claudius McKay, known as Claude McKay, was born Septem or in Nairne Castle near James Hill in upper Clarendon Parish, Jamaica.

He referred to his home village as Sunny Ville, a name given to the area by locals. He was the youngest child of Thomas Francis McKay and Hannah Ann Elizabeth Edwards, well-to-do farmers who had enough property to qualify.

Claude McKay, Code Name Sasha won honorable mention for the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights Book Award. Visiting Faculty Postings and Faculty Fellowships. Holcomb was conferred a Faculty Fellowship Leave for Spring. "Sasha' was the code name adopted by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay () to foil investigations of his life and work.

This work analyzes three of the most important works in McKay's career - the Jazz Age bestseller 'Home to Harlem', the negritude manifesto Banjo, and the unpublished 'Romance in Marseilles.".Claude McKay (), born Festus Claudius McKay, is widely regarded as one of the most important literary and political writers of the interwar period and the Harlem Renaissance.

Born in Jamaica, he moved to the United States in to study at the Tuskegee Institute. Inhe published his most famous novel, Home to Harlem, which won the Harmon Gold Award for Literature.Claude McKay has 44 books on Goodreads with ratings. Claude McKay’s most popular book is Great American Poems.